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Influencer on the Rise This Week: ProdigioPete

Influencer on the Rise This Week: ProdigioPete

Gaming, Movies, Live Stream, Technology, YouTube, Product Ads, Teen Guys
18 Nov 2016
by Tess Moujaes

The month of gaming continues here at Instrumental, in line with the outpour of new releases in the run up to Christmas. Consumers are increasingly turning to gaming YouTube channels as an essential way to try before they buy. These gaming influencers are fast becoming the new generation of independent opinion-formers - regularly uploading brand and product reviews that their viewers trust. 

With the pool of online content creators ever-growing, there is huge opportunity for companies to partner with the most engaging talent driving brand opinion. The key question remains: how can brands discover the right creators to partner with? Our in-house technology tracks these rising digital creators daily, in order to identify the most engaging and fastest-growing talent.  

We unearthed ProdigioPete as one of the Top 20 Fastest Growing Gaming Channels this week. Gaining subscribers at a rate of 8% week-on-week, ProdigioPete is quickly becoming one of the most influential Rainbow 6 Siege gamers on YouTube.

We reached out to Pete to get an insight into how he encourages audience engagement: 

Describe yourself, your channel and how you got started
I started making Youtube videos because I thought it looked like a lot of fun from the outside. And I wasn’t wrong!  A little hobby I could do in the evenings and another outlet to be creative. One of the key aspects was that I wanted to share gaming tips that I felt would help people improve at games and hopefully be able to enjoy their pastime a little more.

How have you worked with brands or causes?
Over my time making videos I’ve been fortunate enough to go and test games in closed door sessions before they are released and provide my feedback to the developers. This has always been a fantastic opportunity but also one I approach with a responsibility – knowing that I am basically there to represent the views and wishes of my YouTube audience.

Aside from the opportunities to test games early and provide feedback, I haven’t yet established any brand partnerships. I have had opportunities but I need to feel there is value for my audience and the fit is right.

During your time as a YouTuber, what video are you most proud of?
There are a few videos that come to mind, but it would have to be a ‘gaming tips’ video.  Some of the tips videos I made for a game called Battlefield 4 took about 40 to 50 hours to create and the feedback I received from those was tremendous. I get a real kick from knowing I’ve helped so many people improve and enjoy the game just that bit more!

Do you have any horror stories from your time on YouTube?
No not really! Making Youtube videos is a blast. I have been privileged to have the chances I have had to work with publishers.  From a video making perspective I do from time to time make a little editing error or a commentary mistake but sometimes these little errors are part of what makes YouTube content relatable, fun and different from the tightly produced mainstream television. It’s just everyday people making videos from their living rooms all across the World! 

How has your channel grown over the past year?
My channel has done very well this year, my audience has almost trebled in size already and hopefully I am on course to get my ‘YouTube Play Button’ in the near future! In all honesty though growing the channel has been the coolest hobby in the world – but it’s important just to focus on making videos, interacting with my audience and the growth will take care of itself.

How do you best engage with your audience?
Engagement with my audience is one of the single most important parts of YouTube for me.  A few times a day, every day I sit down with a cup of coffee and read through the comments on my latest videos and try to respond to as many as possible.  This helps me keep my finger on the pulse and know what they are and aren’t enjoying so much.

I also like to ask questions of my audience in my videos and actively see what their opinions are on the topics discussed. From time to time I do a video series where I feature their ideas and give my feedback in the video.

From your experience, what types of content do your audience prefer?
My audience love shooter and military games – they’re a violent bunch! Of course I’m only kidding, but they do very much know what they like. Videos games in the genre of Battlefield, Rainbow Six Siege etc.

Where do you see yourself in five years?
I am kind of hoping to be Pewdiepie’s personal butler, but if that position doesn’t become vacant then I guess I’d like to be still making videos.  Or working on or creating a video game of my own.