27 – 10 – 2020

How to Book a Gig... and Get Invited Back

Developing a live following is difficult and takes a lot of time and effort...

The below tips came direct from Tunecore's blog - we haven't yet found any better advice when it comes to getting repeat bookings from venues and promoters!

1. BE PROFESSIONAL IN YOUR PITCH

Yes, the promoter knows that you’re self-booking. They still want the comfort of knowing you will take the night seriously. Keep in mind that they’ve probably gotten a few hundred other “booking inquiries” that week. Ask yourself what’s going to make them offer you a slot on one of their nights over those other bands? Some ways to be professional include:


A succinct, clear subject line (i.e: Booking Inquiry – The Beatles October Date @ MSG?).

Be informative in the body of the email. You should include a description of your music, where you’re from and any performance history. It is also necessary to include a link to where the talent buyer can listen to your music and check out your socials.

Don’t have typos!

Follow up approximately 3-5 days after reaching out if you don’t hear back. Also don’t hesitate to pick up the phone. Sometimes that’s the best way to cut through the clutter of acts hitting up a promoter.

Opens Wandering Koreatown I found a welcoming watering hole. in a new tab to view in higher resolution


2. STAY IN TOUCH WITH THE PROMOTER AHEAD OF YOUR SHOW

Nothing makes promoters more nervous than booking a band and not hearing from them again until they show up at the venue night of. Give the promoter updates on what you’re doing to get people to come see your band. Also share any promotional assets such as Facebook events or flyers with the promoter as well. This way they can take comfort in the fact you’re promoting and maybe even help get the word out as well.

3. PROMOTE ON SOCIALS AND ASK YOUR FRIENDS

Actually promote, don’t just show up! Be active on both yours and the band’s social media accounts. Also don’t discount the value of hanging flyers (particularly in the venue) and calling/texting your friends. Sometimes those IRL invites are more memorable than a Facebook invite.

Opens Instagram : @kpbiglife in a new tab to view in higher resolution


4. HELP BOOK THE BILL

This isn’t as important as a lot of the other points on this list but it’s definitely a plus. Promoters are usually booking a bunch of dates at once. If you can book the rest of the band’s on your bill it takes the work off of the promoter’s plate and gives a better chance of the bill being cohesive.

5. BRING YOUR A-GAME

Put in the work before the show to have a great performance. At the end of the day that’s what’s going to ensure people want to see you again and get your band invited back to play on better bills.

6. ON THE DAY, COMMUNICATE WITH THE PROMOTER

Introduce yourself to the promoter when you get there and thank him/her for having you. Thank him/her again at the end of the night and let them know you’ll reach out about subsequent dates.

Opens Sleeping Giant’s last show @ Chain Reaction in a new tab to view in higher resolution


7. FOLLOW UP AFTER YOU PERFORMANCE

Give it a couple of days after the show and then email the promoter. Thank him/her again for having you and then see what upcoming dates he/she has available. If you can get in this routine with a few different promoters, you can put a nice little circuit together for yourself.

8. DON’T OVERBOOK

Space out your dates in any given market! If you play too much in the same area, you’re going to most likely divide your draw. Obviously when you first start playing, do as many low profile gigs as possible to find yourself as a performer, but once you’ve achieved a level of confidence in yourself that you care about draw, try not to play your own market more than once per month.

Promoters will not be happy if they find out you’re playing next door in a week. Neither will your friends and fans be as inclined to come out and support if you’re ALWAYS playing out.

Keep these eight things in mind and you’ll be well on your way to building your live career!

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